Mary Polityka Bush


Embroidered Huck Towels

Huck embroidery was popular in America from the 1920s into the 1950s.

Cheering Daily Life with Depression Lace

Despite its popularity in the 1920s and 1930s, Depression Lace today is generally categorized—and often dismissed—as folk embroidery.

3 Valentine’s Day Gifts to Make and Give

Make someone feel extra special with one of these great craft ideas from Mary Polityka Bush featured in PieceWork’s July/August 2005 issue.

3 Ways to Add Vintage Flair to Your Holiday Wrapping

Why not add a dash of vintage flair to your holiday wrapping? Mary Polityka Bush shared festive ways to wrap gifts in the Nov/Dec 2007 issue of Piecework.

For Richer, Not Poorer: Marrying an English Lord

They were perfect for each other—he had a title, she had a fortune—and so they wed.

The Lace Mantilla: A Centuries-Old Spanish Tradition

In the May/June 2018 issue of PieceWork, our 11th-annual Lace Issue, Mary Polityka Bush tells us about the long tradition of Spanish women wearing a lace mantilla during Holy Week, the period of religious devotion between Palm Sunday and Easter.

The Great Pretender: Dresden Lace Embroidery

The technique known variously as Dresden lace embroidery originated in Dresden, the capital of Saxony, which is located in the southeastern part of present-day Germany, in the seventeenth century.

Inspired by Jane Austen: A Regency-Era Doll Dress to Sew and Embroider

Jane Austen, who never married, had no children of her own. As a doting aunt, Jane is likely to have lavished attention on her numerous nieces and nephews, in particular her older brother Edward’s firstborn daughter, Fanny, who was her favorite niece.

A Huck Towel to Embroider

With its vibrant, geometric designs, the huck towel is a colorful icon of mid-twentieth-century kitchens.

The Traditional Red Embroidery of the Slavic People

Embroidery, one of the foremost Slavic folk arts, was so revered that it was mentioned in folktales, songs, and proverbs.