Inspiration Found in a Knitted Victorian Border | PieceWork

Inspiration Found in a Knitted Victorian Border

Carolyn Wyborny’s crescent-shaped shawl was inspired by an engraving for the French Trellis Border from Weldon’s Practical Knitter Edgings, Fourteenth Series, published in London in 1890.

Carolyn Wyborny 19 days ago

Inspiration Found in a Knitted Victorian Border Primary Image

Carolyn Wyborny’s ingenious and lovely shawl shown with the engraving for the French Trellis Border from Weldon’s Practical Knitter Edgings, Fourteenth Series, published in London in 1890 (and compiled in Weldon’s Practical Needlework, Volume 5). The engraving of the border captured Carolyn’s fancy; the result is this shawl. Photo by Matt Graves.

When I first looked through my Weldon’s Practical Knitter series, I was fascinated by the engraving of the French Trellis Border in Weldon’s Practical Knitter Edgings, Fourteenth Series, published in London in 1890 (and compiled in Weldon’s Practical Needlework, Volume 5). It didn’t look like anything else I had seen in other stitch dictionaries. I was sure this wide dramatic border would make a distinctive edging for a lovely large shawl. When I knitted up a swatch of the border the first time, I clearly saw that there was a mistake in the instructions that was not visible in the engraved image. I always love a challenge, so any errors found or yardage restrictions just add to my enjoyment of the designing process.

I envisioned a design that had a section of plain garter stitch to support and not distract from the beautiful edging. After I corrected the error in the Weldon’s instructions, I created the chart and completed the design with a simple wide garter-stitch body. Because of the wide edging, the body on this shawl is smaller than usual for this type of crescent-shaped shawl.

—Carolyn Wyborny

Since her family was traditional, in that all the women did needlework, Carolyn Wyborny has been crocheting, knitting, and tatting since she was very young. She works as a software engineer for a large high-tech company but spends most of her free time coding up knit and crochet designs. She lives with her husband, two children, and several pets.

This pattern is featured in the Fall 2019 issue of PieceWork.

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